The Modern Life of a Bronze Age Woman

I love it when I run across someone who’s assembled an Ideabox-style post for me! National Geographic’s done a brilliant collection of interdisciplinary resources (geography, chemistry, archaeology, etc) surrounding the Egtved Girl (and bog bodies in general!)

I have pretty vivid memories of the Museum of Science in Boston’s Bog Girl exhibit, including a wobbly platform you could walk on that mimicked the consistency of a peat bog, so maybe you’re not as excited about bog bodies as I am, but you should be! Check out Nat Geo’s links below:

Nat Geo Education Blog

SCIENCE

The stunningly well-preserved remains of a 3,500-year-old woman reveal her travels as a high-status woman of her day. (Nat Geo News)

Learn more about the Egtved Girl and her “bog body” cousins with our video.

Teachers, scroll down for a quick list of key resources, including today’s MapMaker Interactive map, in our Teachers’ Toolkit.

Still a teenager when she died, the remarkably fashionable Egtved Girl was laid to rest about 3,500 years ago. She was buried dressed in a cropped wool bodice with flowing sleeves, a short skirt, and bronze bracelets and earrings. The large bronze disc on her woolen belt probably represented the sun. The Egtved Girl was buried with a birch-bark box containing an awl, bronze pins, and a hairnet. A bark bucket in her coffin revealed traces of Bronze Age beer—made with wheat, bog myrtle, berries, and honey. Illustration by FinnWikiNo, courtesy Wikimedia. CC BY SA 3.0 Still a teenager when she died, the remarkably fashionable Egtved Girl was laid to rest about 3,500 years ago. She was buried dressed in a cropped wool bodice with flowing sleeves, a short skirt, and bronze bracelets and earrings. The large bronze disc on her woolen belt probably represented the sun. The Egtved Girl was buried with a birch-bark box containing an awl, bronze pins, and a hairnet. A bark bucket in her coffin revealed traces of Bronze Age beer—made with wheat, bog myrtle, berries, and honey.
Illustration by FinnWikiNo, courtesy Wikimedia. CC…

View original post 864 more words

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s